2010 Poster Sessions : R2D2: Rapid and Reliable Data Delivery in Data Centers

Student Name : Mohammad Alizadeh, Berk Atikoglu, Jia Shuo Yue
Advisor : Balaji Prabhakar
Research Areas: Computer Systems, Information Systems
Abstract:
Two sources of packet loss exist in current data centers: drops due to congestion episodes, and corruption on the wire due to increasing line rates. These losses increase the difficulty of reliable delivery of packets across the interconnection fabric, by causing timeouts at the transport level. This leads to a loss of throughput and an increase in flow transfer times.

High resolution timers (HRTs) and increased switch buffer sizes have been proposed to mitigate the effects of packet loss. However, HRTs are difficult to implement, and large switch buffers increases packet latency. We propose a new method for rapid and reliable data delivery called R2D2. R2D2 exploits the homogeneity present in data center topologies to aggregate L3 flows into one L2 meta-flow. The simplicity of R2D2 makes it a cost-effective method for improving interconnection fabric reliability. We test a Linux prototype of R2D2 in 1GbE and 10GbE environments and different workloads, and find that it improves TCP performance significantly.

Bios:
Berk Atikoglu is a 3rd year PhD candidate in Electrical Engineering, working with Balaji Prabhakar. His research focuses on congestion control and TCP performance in Data Centers.

Mohammad Alizadeh is a 4th year PhD candidate in the Electrical Engineering department, working with Balaji Prabhakar. His research is primarily focused on designing high performance packet transport mechanisms for data center networks. Mohammad completed his Bachelors degree at Sharif University of Technology. He is a recipient of the Numerical Technologies Fellowship, and the Caroline and Fabian Pease Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

Jia Shuo Yue is a 2nd year PhD candidate in the Electrical Engineering department, working with Balaji Prabhakar. His research focuses on data center technologies for reliable delivery, and intersections of information theory with data networks. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto, and is supported by a NSERC postgraduate fellowship.